Some of the other people we’d like to spotlight . . .

RESEARCH WANT LIST

  Do you have hidden treasures in your attic?
  We welcome photographs of good biographical information on the following persons, for “Deaf Almanac,” “Deaf People in History,” and other features. Photos must be either good physical photos (preferably made from the original negatives) or high-resolution, large-size digital images (300 dpi and up, large files). We’re especially interested in locating photos in private collections and family albums, and other sources we’re not aware of.
  We can’t reprint images copied and pasted from other Websites (e.g., The Silent Worker online archives), newspaper clippings, magazine tearsheets, photocopies of book or magazine pages, scans of printed images (such as photos published in Deaf Heritage), or anything printed from a cheap digital photo-printer. We need high-quality photos. Images posted on the Web don’t have sufficiently high resolution.
  However, if you locate a photo in a book, we may be able to track down the source. Most books list sources for their photos. Please notify us and include citations (author, title, publisher, date, etc.) and source information (e.g., a specific library or archival collection). We want to get as close to the original photos as possible.
  If any of these achievers were part of your family, as ancestors or relatives, and if you know of anyone on your family who has photos and information, let us know.
  We’ve also done our own extensive Google searches. Documentation is exceedingly scanty for many deaf achievers. If you know of any promising leads, let us know. We need specific and accurate contact information.
  Our policy is to give proper credit to our sources—and to proceed with respect to the copyright holders.
  Also note: this is just a partial list. We hope to update it as needed.

Shawn Dale Barnett (4/30/1963—2/23/2003)
Yes, we know about the memorial Website that’s been up for several years, the photos posted there, and the bad links. We’re scouting for real photos and first-person accounts from others who knew him.

Thomas Brown (2/25/1804—3/23/1886)
An early grassroots-Deaf leader who helped prepare the foundation of the NAD, he lived in New Hampshire.
Mentioned in: Harlan Lane, The Worlds of John Brewster

S. Robey Burns (4/9/1894—4/22/1967)
Deaf-sports leader and coach at Illinois School for the Deaf, he enabled two U.S. athletes to enter the International Games for the Deaf (now known as the Deaflympics) in 1935—the first U.S. participation in the Games. He was voted into the AAAD/USADSF Hall of Fame in 1953.
Mentioned in: Jack R. Gannon, Deaf Heritage, old Silent Worker

Charlotte Buell Coman (?/?/1833—11/12/1924)
Coman was the first known deaf artist to exhibit in a gallery. Studying abroad, she became a Barbizon/Hudson River School artist.
Mentioned in: Deborah Meranski Sonnenstrahl, Deaf Artists in America: Colonial to Contemporary

Lawrence Cranford (?—?)
An amateur baseball player
Mentioned in Silent Worker, December 1922 issue

Mario D’Agata (b. 5/29/1926)
An Italian, he’s the only deaf boxer to hold the world crown.
Mentioned in: a few online boxing sites

Amos G. Draper (?—?)
Early leader
Mentioned in: Jack R. Gannon, Deaf Heritage, old Silent Worker

Edward J. Dundon (7/10/1858—8/18/1893)
Early professional pitcher.
Mentioned in: Deaf Heritage and LPF articles.

Kathleen Fettin (11/4/1916—4/?/1966)
She was a gifted amateur actress who appeared in Ernest Marshall’s shoestring-budgeted ASL films, and was probably the first deaf woman to direct a movie.

Angelina Fuller Fischer (8/11/1841—4/2/1925)
Mentioned in: Mabs Holcomb and Sharon Wood, Deaf Women: a Parade through the Decades; James Gallaher, Representative Deaf Persons

Francis Perew Gibson (8/6/1870—11/1929)

Known as “Gib,” he was the first full-time salaried officer of the National Fraternal Society of the Deaf. He staunchly defended the rights of deaf drivers at a time when several states attempted to revoke their licenses—simply because they were deaf. (We would like to obtain old NFSD photos.)
Mentioned in: Jack R. Gannon, Deaf Heritage, old Silent Worker

Georgia Elliot Hasenstab (5/5/1867—7/26/1941)
She appealed to the leaders of the community, and to E.M. Gallaudet, to give women an opportunity to obtain a higher education. As a result, Gallaudet lifted the ban on women students.
Mentioned in: Mabs Holcomb and Sharon Wood, Deaf Women: a Parade through the Decades

Rev. Philip J. Hasenstab (12/22/1861—12/29/1941)
At National Deaf-Mute College (Gallaudet University), Hasenstab was an outstanding football player. He became a teacher and later, the first deaf man ordained as a Methodist minister.
Mentioned in: Jack R. Gannon, Deaf Heritage, old Silent Worker

Helen Heckman (?—?)
She was a dancer, actress, and also a noted beauty.
Mentioned in: Brenda Jo Brueggemann and Susan Burch, Women and Deafness: Double Visions; old Silent Worker

Irene Hodock (1/23/1923—11/27/2006)
Longtime Head Librarian at Indiana School for the Deaf, she substantially increased the library’s holdings and its space. After her retirement, the library was rededicated in her honor.

William Ellsworth “Dummy” Hoy (5/23/1862—12/15/1961)
A number of newspaper photos were taken and published, which we haven’t been able to track down (in physical form). The Hoys were avid snapshot photographers and kept a photograph album of studio portraits and snapshots of their farm in Mt. Healthy, children, and friends. This album was evidently dismantled years ago, and we’d love to locate the original pieces.

Paul D. Hubbard (1/14/1871—6/27/1946)
Playing quarterback on the Gallaudet College football squad from 1892-1895, team captain in 1893 and 1895, he claimed to have invented the defensive huddle to prevent opponents from stealing the team’s signs. We’re looking for family photos and information what he did after Gally.
Mentioned in: Jack R. Gannon, Deaf Heritage, old Silent Worker

George Kihm
Early pro/semi-pro baseball player in Dephos, Ohio.
Mentioned in: a few sources. Team photo posted on genealogical sites, but we want the original photo or a print taken from it.

Louis Kotula (?—?)
Amateur baseball player.
Mentioned in Silent Worker, June 1916

Felix Kowalewski (11/20/1913—8/10/1989)
Artist, writer, and teacher. We’d like to obtain photos and publish full-color images of his works.
Mentioned in: Deborah Meranski Sonnenstrahl, Deaf Artists in America: Colonial to Contemporary

Mike Lamitola (?/?/1955—5/27/2003)
We still lack his birthdate in 1955. We’d also like to obtain more photos.

Ralph LinWeber (?/?/1908—?/?/1997)
Known as the “The Old Grouch,” he was an authority on Toledo Mud Hens and Deaf baseball/softball history. His Basenall Research Bureau was a repository of books, photos, and letters; as far as we call tell, it was broken up and auctioned off after his death. Two fuzzy photos of “Dummy” Taylor and “Dummy” Hoy, at the Ohio State Deaf Softball Tournament on Labor Day Weekend, 1942, were published in his American Deaf Softball Guide (1961). Where might the originals be?
Mentioned in: Jack R. Gannon, Deaf Heritage, SABR Newsletter

Alto M. Lowman (?—?)
The first woman to graduate from Gallaudet College (Gallaudet University).
Mentioned in: John V. Van Cleve and Barry Crouch, A Place of Their Own: Creating the Deaf Community in America, Mabs Holcomb and Sharon Wood, Deaf Women: a Parade through the Decades, James Gallaher, Representative Deaf Persons

Thomas Lynch (?—?)
Outstanding football and baseball player at Gallaudet College (Class of 1886).

Eric F. Malzkuhn
Does anyone have any photos of the 1942 Gallaudet College production of Arsenic and Old Lace staged at Broadway’s Fulton Theatre on May 10, 1942?

The McClure Dynasty
  Does anyone have photos and information on George and/or William McClure, who had long associations with the Kentucky School for the Deaf and Indiana School for the Deaf?
  George M. McClure, Sr. (1861-1966) graduated from and taught at Kentucky School for the Deaf, edited the Kentucky Standard, and received an honorary doctorate from Centre College (1934). Know as the “Dean of LPF Editors,” he lived to be 105. I’d like to know more about his wife, who was also a teacher.
  His son, William C. McClure, and grandson, William J. McClure, were all involved with deaf education. William C. taught at Missouri School for the Deaf. His son William J. was director of athletics at Gallaudet College, became principal of KDES, Assistant Superintendent of Tennessee School for the Deaf (1950-1956), became superintendent of Indiana School for the Deaf in 1957, later of the Florida School for the Deaf and Blind.
Mentioned in: Deaf Heritage and Gallaudet Today

John McDonough (?—?)
Amateur baseball player.
Mentioned in: Silent Worker (July 1915)

James Frederick Meagher (?/?/1886—2/22/1951)
Jimmy Meagher was a leading sportswriter during the heyday of the Little Paper Family, a prolific writer and observer. He originated the National All American Schools for the Deaf basketball selections, and was later voted into the AAAD Hall of Fame.
Mentioned in: Jack R. Gannon, Deaf Heritage, old Silent Worker, Great Deaf Americans

William Mercer [?/?/1765 (?)—?/?/1839]
The first recorded artist born deaf in America, Mercer studied with the distinguished Charles Willson Peale of Philadelphia. His exact birthdate and death dare are probably beyond recovery.
Mentioned in: Deborah Meranski Sonnenstrahl, Deaf Artists in America: Colonial to Contemporary

Frederico Mesa/Fred “Dummy” Mahan (?/?/1907—2/23/1930)
Mesa was a professional boxer whose ring name was “Dummy Mahan.” A native of Tombstone, Arizona, he competed in the Western states. He died in a parachuting fall at age 23; he’d been making the falls in an effort to regain his hearing. His birthdate appears to be lost.
Mentioned in: Boxing Encyclopedia (online), old Silent Worker (December 1926 and January 1927)

Henry Humphrey Moore (7/2/1844—1/1/1926)
Moore was a well-traveled artist whose subjects were taken from his sojourns in Spain, Morocco, Japan, and Paris, ad is high-society clients. Noted for his portraits of society beauties. Where are his paintings to be found now?
Mentioned in: Deborah Meranski Sonnenstrahl, Deaf Artists in America: Colonial to Contemporary, Jack R. Gannon, Deaf Heritage, old Silent Worker

Frederick J. Neesam (?—?)
He organized Gallaudet University’s first basketball team in 1904, then, in 1906, having returned to his alma mater, Wisconsin School for the Deaf, started one there. He also served as the Frat’s Grand President.
Mentioned in: Jack R. Gannon, Deaf Heritage, old Silent Worker

Henry Newman (10/17/1923—?/?/1996)
Noted for his mixed-media collages incorporating bits of old hardware, found objects, and junk, Newman liked to shuffle the boundaries dividing reality and illusion.
Mentioned in: Deborah Meranski Sonnenstrahl. Deaf Artists in America: Colonial to Contemporary
Caution: There are several persons with the same name listed on the Web.

Tony Papalia (10/19/1930—8/17/2007)
Papalia served as Advocate/Paralegal at the NorCal Center on Deafness, then worked with California Center for Law and the Deaf (CalCLAD), then Deaf Counseling, Advocacy, and Referral Agency (DCARA).
Mentioned in: CalCLAD’s and NorCal’s online sites

Elizabeth Peet (?—?)
Complete data needed. (I know about the book in progress.)
Mentioned in: Mabs Holcomb and Sharon Wood, Deaf Women: a Parade through the Decades

Mary Toles Peet (?—?)
Complete data needed. (I know about the book in progress.)
Mentioned in: Mabs Holcomb and Sharon Wood, Deaf Women: a Parade through the Decades

Peter N. Peterson (?—?)
Teacher at Minnesota School for the Deaf; proposed the establishment of a technical college, predating the founding of NTID.
Mentioned in: Deaf Heritage

Parley Patterson Pratt (7/22/1838—11/21/1915)
Head of Ohio Institute’s shoemaking department; introduced baseball to the school, which became the first school for the deaf to have a team.
Mentioned in: various sources, OSD’s historical reports, etc.

Elmer Priester (?—?)
Legendary prankster
Mentioned in: Bernard Bragg, Lessons in Laughter

Arthur S. Rasmussen (?—?)
Amateur baseball player.
Mentioned in: Silent Worker, March 1922

Warren Robinson (?—?)
Alumnus of Wisconsin School for the Deaf; graduated from Gallaudet University in 1884, WSD’s first gymnastics teacher; promoted technical education for deaf students.
Mentioned in: Jack R. Gannon, Deaf Heritage

St. Filippo Smaldone (7/27/1848—6/4/1923)
A native of Naples, he was an Italian diocesan priest (hearing) who ministered to deaf people, he was canonized in 2006. He founded a school for the deaf at Lecce, and also co-founded the Salesian Sisters of the Sacred Heart. Anyone know how he communicated with them? Anyone have any pictures?
Mentioned in: Wikipedia, Catholic Forum, Salesian Sisters of the Sacred Heart’s Italian site, and a few other Italian online pages

Linwood D. Smith (8/8/1943—11/14/1982)
Black Deaf advocate, co-author (with Ernest E. Hairston, Jr.) of Black and Deaf in America: Are We That Different? (1983).

Carl Peter Von Woedtke (7/21/1864—8/23/1927)
Polish-German sculptor.

George Veditz (8/13/1861—3/12/1937)
We’re seeking more information and photos.
Mentioned in: Jack R. Gannon, Deaf Heritage, John V. Van Cleve and Barry Crouch, A Place of Their Own: Creating the Deaf Community in America, Harry J. Lang and Bonnie Meath-Lang, Deaf Persons in the Arts and Sciences, Gallaudet Encyclopedia of Deaf People and Deafness, old Silent Worker

Nellie Zabel Willhite (11/22/1892—9/2/1991)
We’re still trying to locate the original or a good print of the photo of her standing in front of the Pard (s reproduced in Deaf Heritage, pages 194-195.

Others:
Early baseball players included Lester Rosson, Harry Dix, Dalton Fuller, Gillespie (first name unknown), and Charles Whitney.

 

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